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Antivaccine nonsense Autism Medicine

David Kirby smacked down–and not by me!

As you may have guessed, I’m tired of David Kirby. I’ve slapped down his nonsense so many times before, but, like the Energizer Bunny, he keeps going and going and going, spewing his pseudoscientific antivaccine nonsense, all the while asking that we really, truly believe that he isn’t “antivaccine.” He just repackages standard antivaccine tropes in clever and dense verbiage to make them somewhat less obvious–but not to those of us familiar with them.

Most recently, he attacked Dr. Rahul K. Parikh, a pediatrician who wrote an excellent and largely favorable review of Dr. Paul Offit’s latest book Autism’s False Prophets for Salon.com. His attack, on Age of Autism, was hilariously inept and disingenuous.

Now, Dr. Parikh has called Kirby out on his crap, firing back with a devastating salvo on his own Salon.com blog. Read it. Savor it. Enjoy it. It is indeed a joy to behold. I just wish I had some popcorn.

In the meantime, I can’t resist pointing out that David Kirby once again destroyed yet another of Orac’s irony circuits with this sentence in his attack on Dr. Parikh:

Misinformation is a dangerous thing.

I tell ya, I need to buy a warehouse full of these circuits if I’m going to stay in this fray. David Kirby, propagandist and master of antivaccine misinformation, pointing out that misinformation is dangerous?

No irony meter or circuit could withstand that.

By Orac

Orac is the nom de blog of a humble surgeon/scientist who has an ego just big enough to delude himself that someone, somewhere might actually give a rodent's posterior about his copious verbal meanderings, but just barely small enough to admit to himself that few probably will. That surgeon is otherwise known as David Gorski.

That this particular surgeon has chosen his nom de blog based on a rather cranky and arrogant computer shaped like a clear box of blinking lights that he originally encountered when he became a fan of a 35 year old British SF television show whose special effects were renowned for their BBC/Doctor Who-style low budget look, but whose stories nonetheless resulted in some of the best, most innovative science fiction ever televised, should tell you nearly all that you need to know about Orac. (That, and the length of the preceding sentence.)

DISCLAIMER:: The various written meanderings here are the opinions of Orac and Orac alone, written on his own time. They should never be construed as representing the opinions of any other person or entity, especially Orac's cancer center, department of surgery, medical school, or university. Also note that Orac is nonpartisan; he is more than willing to criticize the statements of anyone, regardless of of political leanings, if that anyone advocates pseudoscience or quackery. Finally, medical commentary is not to be construed in any way as medical advice.

To contact Orac: [email protected]

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