Categories
Complementary and alternative medicine Medicine Quackery

Mike Adams’ 10 biggest lies about health care

It’s good to be home.

True, while I was away for five days, first to NECSS and then to the AACR Meeting, mail piled up, and I had to go through it last night. Also, just for the heck of it, my wife and I went out to dinner at a local diner. Finally, to complete the unwinding process, last night I sat on my posterior and watched a couple of shows that I had missed during my absence, while lazily searching the web for material to get me back into the blogging thing. Yes, I know I spent a fair amount of verbiage yesterday taking down a mountain of burning stupid by everybody’s favorite science-, reason-, and logic-challenged homeopath Dana Ullman, but one post alone isn’t enough to get me back into the groove after an absence of several days. I need more. Fortunately, there’s one other woo-meister who has been a frequent target–I mean topic–of this blog. Yes, I’m referring to the one man who comes closest to capturing the crazy vibe of the One True Site of All Woo on the Internet, Whale.to. I’m referring, not surprisingly, to that promoter of all medical woo, that man who never saw a form of quackery he didn’t like or a pharmaceutical drug he did like, Mike Adams of NaturalNews.com, who has produced yet another screed so brain dead, so full of logical fallacies, so chock full of straw men that I wonder if he does it intentionally in order to provide fodder for skeptic blogs.

Naaahh. Adams just isn’t smart enough or knowledgeable enough. It’s all him, and he’s sincere. His brain also apparently consists of two neurons connected by a spirochete, and he just got a massive dose of penicillin. (Think about it a minute; you’ll understand what I mean.) Just look at his latest attack on scientific medicine if you don’t believe me. It’s entitled The 10 biggest health care lies in America, and it’s one of the biggest unintentional gigglefests I’ve seen in a long, long time. He starts with an introduction to set the scene:

Mainstream health care isn’t based on “health” or “caring.” It’s actually based on an ingrained system of medical mythology that’s practiced — and defended — by those who profit from the continuation of sickness and disease. This system of medical mythology might also simply be called “lies”, and today I’m sharing with NaturalNews readers the top ten lies that are still followed and promoted under mainstream health care in America today.

Whenever you hear Mike Adams accuse anyone of lies, you know it’s a massive case of projection. This case is no different. What Adams accuses science-based medicine of are lies, but the only lies here are his. In fact, his world view is based on nothing more than mythology, the mythology that “natural” means better, that magical thinking can cure disease, and that vaccines are evil incarnate. So let’s march through Mike Adams’ ten lies, realizing that the lies there are not the lies of scientific medicine but those of Mike Adams:

Lie #1) Vaccines make you healthy

This is a massive straw man argument. No one says that vaccines make you healthy. They are, however, very effective at preventing infectious disease. While it’s true that remaining free of infectious disease is a very good thing indeed, it is not enough in and of itself to be free of infectious disease to be healthy, yet that is the position that Adams tries to pin on advocates of science-based medicine. He even claims that vitamin D is more effective than the H1N1 vaccine at preventing the flu. Not surprisingly, he does so with no evidence. The article that he cites as evidence of his claim in turn also contains no evidence to support his claim. Such is Adam’s methodology.

Next up:

Lie #2) Pharmaceuticals prevent disease

The big push by Big Pharma is now focused on treating healthy people with drugs as if pharmaceuticals were nutrients that could somehow prevent disease. This is the new push with cholesterol drugs: Give ’em to everyone, whether they have high cholesterol or not!

But pharmaceuticals don’t prevent disease, and medications are not vitamins. Your body has no biological need for any pharmaceuticals at all. People who believe they need pharmaceuticals have simply been the victims of “fabricated consent” engineered by Big Pharma’s clever advertising and P.R. spin.

This is, of course, simply false. Vaccines prevent disease. Cholesterol-reducing drugs decrease the risk of heart disease and heart attacks. Controlling blood pressure with antihypertensive drugs decreases the risk of stroke and heart attack In women at high risk for breast cancer, Tamoxifen can reduce that risk by 50%. While it can be argued that pharmaceutical companies are overly eager to sell “preventative” drugs for an ever-expanding list of indications, many of these drugs actually do work. The questions around them tend to revolve mainly around cost and whether there are side effects that make the benefits not worth the cost.

As for the bit about the body not requiring pharmaceuticals, that is yet another massive straw man. No one says that the body does require these drugs. They are not food, and no one claims that they are food. Indeed, comparing them to food is disingenuous. Even so, many of these drugs have helped prolong life and prevent complications of disease.

Here’s one of the funniest ones:

Lie #3) Doctors are experts in health

Doctors don’t even study health; they study disease. Modern doctors are taught virtually nothing about nutrition, wellness or disease prevention. Expecting a doctor to guide you on health issues is sort of like expecting your accountant to pilot a jet airliner — it’s simply not something he or she has ever been trained in.

That’s not to say doctors aren’t intelligent people. Most of them have high Iqs. But even a genius can’t teach you something they know nothing about.

If a genius can’t teach you something they know nothing about, what can a moron like Mike Adams teach you about what he knows nothing about? Is his stupid a multiplier of ignorance? Inquiring minds want to know!

In any case, it’s bullshit, plain and simple, that doctors are not taught about nutrition or disease prevention. We are. The difference is that physicians are taught about nutrition and disease prevention based on science and evidence, not based on fairy dust, fantasy, and nonsense, which are the basis underlying Adams’s world view, which brings us to:

Lie #4) You have no role in your own healing

That is a lie, but not in the way that Adams thinks. It’s a lie to claim that modern medicine says you have no role in your health. In fact, it’s such a ridiculous, transparent lie that I call it a lie. As idiotic as Adams is, even I don’t think he’s idiotic enough to actually believe this one. This one too:

Lie #5) Disease is a matter of bad luck or bad genes

Western medicine wants you to believe in the mythology of spontaneous disease — disease that strikes without cause. This is equivalent to saying that disease is some sort of voodoo black magic and that patients have no way to prevent disease through their own diets or lifestyle choices.

It’s funny, actually: Western medicine claims to be driven by scientific, rational thinking, and yet the entire industry still fails to acknowledge that chronic disease always has a cause and that most of the time, that cause has everything to do with nutritional deficiencies, exposure to toxic chemicals and a lack of exercise.

Disease is almost never a matter of bad luck or bad genes.

Actually, disease is quite often a matter of bad luck and/or bad genes. It can be bad luck to be exposed to pathogenic bacteria or viruses. It can be bad luck that one of your cells acuqired just the right set of mutations to result in cancer. It could be bad genes, such as having cancer-causing mutations in BRCA1, some mutations of which result in an 80% or greater chance of developing breast cancer within a woman’s lifetime. In fact, having such a bad gene is purely bad luck because you can’t control who your parents are. Take a disease like Huntington’s chorea, the gene for which is an autosomal dominant. If one of your parents has it, you have a 50% chance of developing the disease. It’s nothing but bad luck to be born to a parent with the gene.

In reality, Adams is giving voice to one of the most persistent myths of the “alt-med” movement, namely that you can always prevent disease, that disease is never due to bad luck, that it is always due to your choices. It is the myth of total control. If you eat the right diet, take the right supplements, consume the right vitamins, do the right exercises, in the eyes of Adams and people like him you become virtually immune to any disease. You become magically immune to cancer. Even infectious disease can’t affect you. Because you’re among the righteous, and disease is a punishment for not living an upright and “healthy” life. Adams’ view has far more in common with religion than it does with science, and his view of disease echoes, more closely than anything else, the view of ancient races or medieval priests that disease is a punishment from the gods or from God, except in this case it’s nature’s punishment.

Next up:

Lie #6) Screening equals prevention

Western medicine doesn’t believe in disease prevention. Rather, the industry believes in screening while calling it prevention. But screening isn’t prevention by even the wildest stretch of the imagination. In fact, virtually all the popular screening methodologies actually promote diseases.

This is one where there’s a grain of truth to it that Adams has stretched beyond all reality. Screening is viewed as a form of prevention, the idea being to detect disease at an earlier stage, when it is either easier to treat or when intervention may prevent the sequelae of a condition. It is also true that screening is a complicated issue with tradeoffs and the necessity to evaluate risks versus benefits. Some screening tests detect disease that would never develop to the point of threatening the patient’s life, which is known as overdiagnosis. The issue came to the fore when the USPSTF issued new guidelines for mammographic screening for cancer. Practitioners of science-based medicine are aware of the complexities and tradeoffs of screening an asymptomatic population for disease, any disease. It is Mike Adams who seems to view screenign as an all-or-nothing affair, and to him it’s all bad.

On to the next one:

Lie #7) Health insurance will keep you healthy

Again, this is a massive straw man. No one says this. Having insurance doesn’t keep you healthy. However, it does allow you to access the health care system when you become ill, and it does allow you to access preventative care that you might not be able to afford for yourself, such as colonoscopies after age 50. Also, don’t forget that there is a fair amount of evidence that people without health insurance suffer poorer outcomes due to a variety of diseases because they delay seeking care. By the time they do, their conditions are more advanced and more difficult to treat.

Lie #8) Hospitals are places of health and healing

Again, this is mostly a straw man. Hospitals are places for the treatment of acute diseases. These days, we try very hard to keep patients out of hospitals and to minimize their time in the hospital. I will admit, though, that I’m amazed that Adams was willing to admit that hospitals are actually quite good at saving lives after trauma.

Lie #9 cracked me up:

Lie #9) Conventional medicine is “advanced” state-of-the-art medicine

Even though doctors and health authorities try to pass off western medicine as being “advanced” or “modern,” the whole system is actually pathetically outdated and stuck in the germ theory of disease. Western medicine has yet to even acknowledge the role of nutrition in preventing disease — something that has been scientifically documented for at least the last several decades. Western medicine fails to acknowledge mind-body medicine and hilariously believes the mind plays virtually no role in healing.

Neither does western medicine acknowledge the bio energy field of living systems, nor that organ transplants carry memories, nor that living food is qualitatively different from dead food. Seriously: Conventional doctors still believe that dead food is exactly the same as living food! (And the USDA food pyramid still makes no distinction between the two…)

Adams accuses modern medicine of being “stuck in the germ theory of disease” as though that were a bad thing! It’s also utter nonsense that “Western” medicine doesn’t acknowledge the role of nutrition in preventing disease. Is Adams on crack? What Adams doesn’t like is that there is no evidence to support the magical, mystical properties attributed to food by Adams and his ilk.

Perhaps the reason that “Western” medicine doesn’t acknowledge that living food is qualitatively different from “dead” food is because there is no evidence it is, at least not in the way that Adams thinks, with “living energy” in “living” plants that somehow makes them healthier to eat. Perhaps the reason “Western” medicine doesn’t acknowledge that organ transplants carry memories is because there is no evidence that they do. Perhaps the reason that “Western” medicine doesn’t acknowledge the existence of qi is because there is no good evidence that it exists or that magically manipulating it the way that reiki practitioners or acupuncturists say can heal disease.

But what do I know? After all, I don’t want to know the truth, and I don’t want cures. Just ask Mike Adams:

Lie #10) More research is needed to find “cures”

This lie is especially hilarious because western medicine does not believe in any “cure” for any disease. They aren’t even looking for cures! This lie has been repeated since the 1960’s, when cancer scientists claimed they were only a few years away from curing cancer. Today, four decades later, can you think of a single major disease that western medicine has cured? There aren’t any.

Uh, I can think of major diseases that Western medicine has cured. There are a whole bunch of infectious diseases, for instance, that antibiotics can cure. There are several varieties of cancer that are curable with a high degree of probability. In my own field of surgery, I can point out several diseases that are completely curable with surgery, including appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstructions, hernias, and broken bones. Adams is just plain wrong. Whatever “Western” medicine’s faults–and there are many–it is not so useless and pathetic that it can’t cure a single disease. it may not do so well with chronic diseases at times, but it sure as hell can cure a lot of acute diseases, and it can manage quite a few chronic diseases quite well. Adams claims that the “cures” exist in the form of naturopathic medicines, herbal remedies, and nutrition, but he attributes far more power to these modalities than evidence supports. Besides, there’s no such thing as “Western” medicine or “alternative” medicine. There’s medicine that has been proven scientifically to work, medicine that hasn’t, and medicine that has been proven not to work. When an “alternative” medical treatment is proven to work, it become simply medicine.

Not that that stops Adams from spraying burning stupid hither and yon over his readers like napalm, or perhaps the way Marines used to aim their flamethrowers into Japanese pillboxes on Guadalcanal back in 1943 in order to incinerate the defenders. Only in this case, it’s Adams sticking the nozzle of his flamethrower of burning stupid into your ear and incinerating your brain. It’s about the only thing he’s good at besides lying.

By Orac

Orac is the nom de blog of a humble surgeon/scientist who has an ego just big enough to delude himself that someone, somewhere might actually give a rodent's posterior about his copious verbal meanderings, but just barely small enough to admit to himself that few probably will. That surgeon is otherwise known as David Gorski.

That this particular surgeon has chosen his nom de blog based on a rather cranky and arrogant computer shaped like a clear box of blinking lights that he originally encountered when he became a fan of a 35 year old British SF television show whose special effects were renowned for their BBC/Doctor Who-style low budget look, but whose stories nonetheless resulted in some of the best, most innovative science fiction ever televised, should tell you nearly all that you need to know about Orac. (That, and the length of the preceding sentence.)

DISCLAIMER:: The various written meanderings here are the opinions of Orac and Orac alone, written on his own time. They should never be construed as representing the opinions of any other person or entity, especially Orac's cancer center, department of surgery, medical school, or university. Also note that Orac is nonpartisan; he is more than willing to criticize the statements of anyone, regardless of of political leanings, if that anyone advocates pseudoscience or quackery. Finally, medical commentary is not to be construed in any way as medical advice.

To contact Orac: [email protected]

114 replies on “Mike Adams’ 10 biggest lies about health care”

But, but, but he told me that aspartame is going to be sold as a natural product called AminoSweet AND THAT’S BAAADDD!!!111!!!

But not the other amino acid dipeptides manufactured by Ajinomoto and sold for production of natural supplements, I guess…

He even claims that vitamin D is more effective than the H1N1 vaccine at preventing the flu

I suspect he’s referring to recent research from Japan (1) in which a small RCT found that vitamin D was 40-60% effective against influenza A in children.

—–
1. Urashima, M. et al. Randomized trial of vitamin d supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza a in schoolchildren. The American journal of clinical nutrition (2010). URL http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.29094.

Lie #5) Disease is a matter of bad luck or bad genes

Lie #9) Conventional medicine is “advanced” state-of-the-art medicine

Even though doctors and health authorities try to pass off western medicine as being “advanced” or “modern,” the whole system is actually pathetically outdated and stuck in the germ theory of disease.

Is he trying to generate some of the old conflict between the germ theory and spontaneous generation? That could be fun. πŸ™‚

@Rogue Medic:

No, he’s trying to see whether any of his sycophants notice the blatant contradiction, so that they can be purged.

Even though doctors and health authorities try to pass off western medicine as being “advanced” or “modern,” the whole system is actually pathetically outdated and stuck in the germ theory of disease.

I wonder what he thinks of homoeopathy, which hasn’t even got that far and is still stuck somewhere at the tail end of the 18th century, with miasms and psora.

So, just how does a box of wires and blinking lights giggle anyway?

As for the bit about the body not requiring pharmaceuticals, that is yet another massive straw man. No one says that the body does require these drugs.

I’ll go a step further on this one and say that in some cases the body does require some drugs to be healthy. I’m specifically referring to medications such as synthetic thyroid hormone. Granted, a healthy person doesn’t need them, but for those of us who are unable to produce them, they are essential for good health.

Of course, according to this wing nut I’ve done something wrong to cause my thyroid problems. I guess its all that dead food I eat or something. If only I had eaten live food my thyroid would still be functioning today. Maybe it’s not too late. Pardon me while I head out to a farm so I can gnaw on Bessie as she wanders around the pasture.

Ok…call me dumb…but what is the difference between living and dead food. I get it with animals, but if you pluck a bean off the vine, do you not kill the bean too?
Thanks for any clarification. Need to go eat my bacon now.

All of this is false, and much of it dangerous—but what infuriates me is the blame-the-victim mentality.

In Adams’s world-view, it is somehow my friend’s fault that she has been unable to walk without pain for over thirty years. Not the fault of the bastard who got drunk, got behind the wheel of a car, and injured my then-11-year-old friend and killed her sister.

In that world-view, the people left with chronic lung disease from breathing the fumes produced by the destruction of the World Trade Center somehow did something wrong, and can overcome it by exercise or the right diet. Not the fault of the people who flew the planes into the towers. (Or maybe he’d be willing to blame this one on the government, since the EPA lied and told us all it was safe.)

I’m confused…Adams says this?

Neither does western medicine acknowledge the bio energy field of living systems, nor that organ transplants carry memories…

I’ve heard of people claiming that organ transplants carry memories, but always anecdotes…”so and so is SO much (dead person who donated their organ), and they weren’t like that before.”

But I haven’t been able to find any real research. Any suggestions about search terms?

Orac is right to regularly tear Mikey a new one. Adams deserves it but as with most of these charlatans, follow the money. Adams is selling competitive (to sbm) products and whether or not their efficacy is proven or even tested is of no concern. In fact, expensive testing would cut into his bottom line. Adams has found a significantly large population of credulous fools willing to part with a few bucks to enjoy his aura of false good health.

Adams never fails to make me laugh,however,there is something about him that’s not funny at all: he has a large audience.Like Null,he probably grossly inflates the figures(and doesn’t discount those who check in solely for snark fodder)as being in the “millions”.Unfortunately,they influence decision making in vulnerable people:I have heard people with serious illness consulting Null over the radio and at a live “lecture” who were discouraged about conventional treatments in favor of woo-centric modalities.That’s not a joke.

I’m with #7, what the heck is “living” food? Eating live shrimp (done in Japan), eating plants as they are growing?

@nlgirl (#7)

The difference between living and “dead” food is subtle and mostly in the minds of people like Mike Adams who cling to the vitalistic concept of organics.

Most fresh vegetables are quite capable of germinating and growing a new plant. Beans, peas, corn, nuts, etc. are just the seeds of their plant species. They are how it reproduces. Plant them and they will sprout.

Root vegetables like potatoes and carrots will also start growing. They don’t even need to be planted. Just leave a bag of potatoes on your kitchen counter for a few weeks and they will start putting out roots.

But freezing or cooking them interferes with this by damaging the underlying structure with ice crystals or breaking down the chemicals with heat.

But, once the food gets into the chemical factory of your stomach and intestines, this difference is moot unless there are a few free-riders piggy-backing along. If Mike Adams really eats only fresh, “live” food, I wonder if he ever gets a staph or e coli infection?

If you eat the right diet, take the right supplements, consume the right vitamins, do the right exercises, in the eyes of Adams and people like him you become virtually immune to any disease.

Not only that; you should in theory become immortal if you simply do all the right things. But as well all know, Hulda Clark died of cancer, and Adams will one day be dead as well. Chances are he will die because of a disease.

So, just how does a box of wires and blinking lights giggle anyway?

Better question: how does it go to the theatre with its wife? Does it dress in a tuxedo? Maybe with a monocle on its webcam?

My favourite part of the “live food” lie is that he starts the point by saying that “western” medicine is stuck in an out-dated paradigm. You might be able to stretch the timeline for germ theory back to van Leeuwenhoek (but it’s closer to Koch, about 100 years back). Vitalism (the idea that living substances are ensouled and are different from dead substances) goes back to at least Aristotle’s day. Which is to say nothing of the fact that it has been shown to be untrue.

Also, I thought it was cheeky of him to say that they are “qualitatively” different substances. Filtered tap water is qualitatively different from filtered bottled water, but they have identical properties.

This is an excellent post, and destroys whatever credibility he may have. Sadly, he has his legions of suckers.

Mike Adams is a coward, both intellectually and pysically. He ran away to South America and never engages in discussion or debate with anyone. He claims to be a former US Army Ranger, but, he was most likely a R.E.M.F. and never saw combat for a second.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Tonight @9(EST),Mikey features Dr.Carolyn Dean,”MD”(sic),ND,on his weekly show.According to Quackwatch,this “doctor of the future” lost her license to practice medicine in her native Ontario in 1995.

Western medicine has yet to even acknowledge the role of nutrition in preventing disease — something that has been scientifically documented for at least the last several decades.

Yeah, scientifically documented by scientists, some of whom are physicians. Nice self-contradiction. Who does he think is scientifically documenting the role of nutrition in preventing disease if not people involved in medicine; Eastern mystics?

Woo hoo! Another Orac SMACKDOWN. I love it.

One of the strangest non-existent things I think woomeisters promote is the conscious mind’s ability to control the body at the cellular level. (as in Andrew Weil’s “happy people don’t get sick” meme) Hell, if I could tell my cells what to do, I’d tell them all to give me a 21-year-old body again. AND keep it that way! πŸ™‚

Thanks again Orac. Keep on smackin’!!!

@4 madder,

@Rogue Medic:

No, he’s trying to see whether any of his sycophants notice the blatant contradiction, so that they can be purged.

A lovely coffee enema ought to take care of that purging. Or is he branching out into bulemia products.

Mike Adams could could be the best name brand for ipecac.

I think the idea is that raw seeds and fruit and leaves and tubers and things contain still-living cells. Cooked, they’re dead. It’s a minor variation on the raw food fad.

There was a Red Green episode which sort of referenced this. πŸ˜› The guys were about to butcher a cow out in a parking lot, and Harold (while munching an apple) complained to Red that this was inhumane.

“Are you seriously gonna go all Texas Chainsaw Massacre on that poor, defenseless milk-maker?”
“Well at least we’re doing the humane thing and killing it first. You’re eating that apple alive.”
(Harold recoils.)

It is, of course, absurd, and just another way to promote a course which is nearly impossible to comply with and therefore very difficult to see fail. It’s not the diet that failed — it’s *you*. This sort of thinking is very common, because it’s so appealing to feel you have the answer, and so hard to admit, even to yourself, when you actually don’t.

@ 6 Jojo

+1
I totally agree.

We can also talk about insulin or any other hormone therapy. Not to mention antibiotics or other naturally-occurring substances (botox?) which are definitely used both by animals/plants/fungi/bacteria/LGM* and human medicine for their particular biological functions.
To put it another way: so a stupid mold can use a weird molecule to kill bacteria, but we should not use it because it’s not produced by our own body? What’s the point of being a tool-using species, then?

The distinction between a drug and a natural molecule is disingenuous. By definition, a drug is a biologically active molecule (in a medical context). There is going to be a huge overlap between the two categories.

Not that I am advocating for polypharmacy, mind you. I don’t think reaching for a pill every times you feel sick is a good reflex. Consulting a real physician, on the other hand, is.
Notice also that this pill-reaching reflex is exactly that this naturopathy crowd is doing, despite all their drug-decrying posture. They want a pill to live forever. Calling these molecules “natural” or “food supplement” doesn’t change the fact that this is pill-taking behaviour.

@ 8 Vicki

Sadly, I’m afraid Mr Adams has another answer for this particular case. He professed in the past some 9/11 truther beliefs. It was part of a rant a few months ago about what skeptics believe, in his opinion (also chokefull of fallacies).
So, see, it’s never the fault of Good Loving Mother Nature, it’s always this fascist US gov’.
(note for any passerby – last sentence was “Sarcasm Inside tm”)

*Little Green Men

Not that that stops Adams from spraying burning stupid hither and yon over his readers like napalm, or perhaps the way Marines used to aim their flamethrowers into Japanese pillboxes on Guadalcanal back in 1943 in order to incinerate the defenders. Only in this case, it’s Adams sticking the nozzle of his flamethrower of burning stupid into your ear and incinerating your brain. It’s about the only thing he’s good at besides lying.

That’s too funny. Made my day.

#9 – This isn’t the most helpful, but Mary Roach’s book Stiff mentions some extremely shoddy research regarding the memory of transplanted organs, and IIRC some better research done that demonstrated it was all bogus. The research “proving” that organs have a memory was all anecdotal and based on stereotypes. I think one of the anecdotes was a woman who received an organ from a prostitute and became really promiscuous, for example.

You wonder:

If a genius can’t teach you something they know nothing about, what can a moron like Mike Adams teach you about what he knows nothing about? Is his stupid a multiplier of ignorance? Inquiring minds want to know!

I can enlighten you. Mike Adams has homeopathic intelligence. Many years ago, he had an intelligent thought, then he banged his head on a wall until it was all gone.

Simple. A 30C IQ.

“Hulda Clark died of cancer, and Adams will one day be dead as well. Chances are he will die because of a disease.”

He may never die. The raging stupidity flowing through his system would cause any self-respecting disease organism to recoil.

Well thank you, Amazon’s “search inside the book” feature – I found the portion of Stiff that discusses organ memory. Apparently it’s a belief with heart transplants specifically. The evidence she cites is a 1991 interview – of 47 heart transplant patients interviewed by a team of Viennese surgeons, 3 claimed to have had changes in personality following transplant and ascribed those changes to their donated heart.

The other person she cites is a guy named Paul Pearsall, who sounds like a self-help-through-alt-med type. He is the one with all of the silly stereotypes – woman gets heart of gay man and becomes super-feminine, woman gets heart of prostitute and become super-promiscuous, man gets heart of teenager and now loves rock and roll music. Needless to say, these are all anonymous anecdotes presented in one of his books.

Oddly enough, the debunking information is partially presented by someone we’ve seen here before – Dr. Oz. I think this must be before he was famous, since she only introduces him as “Mehmet Oz, the transplant surgeon I spoke with”.

The section starts around 189-190 in the paperback edition.

Western medicine…isn’t that kind of insulting? Claiming that science & evidence based medicine is somehow the property of American/European cultures. Science belongs to all people, not just ‘the west’. Furthermore, disease being bad luck, I can just imagine seeing Adams try to tell some young healthy athletic person with cancer that their illness is their own fault. I wonder how long it would be before one of them handed Adams his butt neatly wrapped with all the trimmings?

I swear I am allergic to this level of stupidity. DRY ITCHY rash…

Scary part..is he has FOLLOWERS… and on the spectrum of WOOPID.. the other thing that frightens me.. is there are people that think AdAMS isn’t aggressive enough in his WOOPIDITY.

“Adams’ view has far more in common with religion than it does with science, and his view of disease echoes, more closely than anything else, the view of ancient races or medieval priests that disease is a punishment from the gods or from God…”
Actually, the “mainstream” of religious traditions don’t have much trouble with the idea of “bad things happen to good people” (see Book of Job). Views to the contrary, as in “health and wealth”/ “name it and claim it” in modern American Christianity, are more of a populist or “fringe” phenomenon.

@31: that sort of depends…

if you indeed eat live animals (cue mental image of one very scared/angry pig) … you might get scratches or bites that would be possible sites for infection, so in that case, you might NOT really be considered healthier.

Can anyone tell me where I can find one of these “Western” doctors? My doctor is always on me about getting more exercise and eating vegetables. I would prefer one that lets me eat chili dogs and watch TV in peace.

Reminds me of the time I came across the recipe for live goose (put goose inside a ring of fire with lots of apple sauce- heat stressed goose will eat apple sauce, defecate a lot, and collapse and slowly be cooked).

‘Live food’ has had unpleasant connotations for me ever since.

@31

I wonder if Mr. Adams eats raw potatoes. They contain a nasty protein that binds digestive enzymes and causes food to form undigested boluses, causing painful cramps.

Cooking food “kills” stuff, like toxic proteins for plant defense and parasite eggs. It’s a good thing.

If you eat a freshwater fish, pig, or cow (and a bunch of other things) alive you might end up with a tapeworm. Or Trichinosis. I am sure those are okay though, they are natural.

Ooh, I had another thought!

If Mike gets a Salmonella sp. infection from eating live food like raw veggies grown in compost or raw chicken, someone should definitely make a documentary about it. “Meet the man who said live food was better than dead food. Notice the gangrene setting in.”

Ok…call me dumb…but what is the difference between living and dead food. I get it with animals, but if you pluck a bean off the vine, do you not kill the bean too?

According to the raw-foodists, the enzymes in plants (which are destroyed by cooking) are good for you. The claims of why they’re good for you ranges from the least absurd of aiding digestion, to the more absurd of the human body producing no enzymes of its own and needing an external source, to the most absurd of “enzymes” being a synonym for “vital force”.

I don’t know if Adams is a raw-foodist, but his bit about “living foods” sounds pretty close to it.

“Reminds me of the time I came across the recipe for live goose (put goose inside a ring of fire with lots of apple sauce)”

This sounds like Johnny Cash on drugs.

Ahh…the name of Carolyn Dean has cropped up…I had a tussle with this mental midget back in the 90s when she surfaced on the Dini Petty talk show to do some label reading. Her astute advice to the public was “if you can’t pronounce it, don’t eat it.” I engaged her in some energetic correspondence, pointing out that the number of syllables in a chemical’s name has nothingto do with determining its safety and she shot back with some incomprehensibel drivel about the wonders of homeopathy. For a couple of years we went back and forth with our attempts to educate each other. I tried to edify her in chemistry (a class she had obviously skipped throughout her “education”)and she regaled me with the miracles of homeopathy. She was excellent fodder for my radio show. Could always count on her for some imbecilic comment. Not quite the burning stupid of Mike Adams…let’s face it..Adams cannot be matched. He is the village idiot in a village of village idiots. Then in the late 90s, one of my letters came back..”address unknown.” (Yes..we corresponded by snail mail..she never did get into email…too bad because she could have followed in Benveniste’s footsteps with “homeopathic email”) Turned out she had migrated to greener pastures in the US where her brand of malarkey was more marketable. I would love to take credit for driving her out of Canada but I think it was the attraction of milking the great American public that actually did it. Adams and Carolyn Dean make a good combo of synergistic stupidity.

It’s hilarious that these enzyme know-it-alls presume a superior knowledge of nutrition, yet don’t know that enzymes are proteins which are denatured by gastric acid and are broken down by pancreatic proteases in the duodenum before being absorbed.

Organ transplants carry memories?

Organ tranplants carry MEMORIES?

ORGAN TRANSPLANTS CARRY MEMORIES?!!?

Just when I think Mike Adams can’t get loonier, he does something like this.

Wait, if organ transplants carry memories, shouldn’t blood transfusions do so as well?

@47:

Oh yes, that’s a common belief, it’s all over the internet. Apparently it’s the premise of Cecilia Ahern’s romance novel Thanks for the Memories, too: woman gets blood transfusion from a man, gains his memories and personality, the magic link draws them together… Sounds a lot more creepy than romantic, to me.

@Jeff Read:

From your link:

What matters is that you get some raw with every meal, that’s what matters. In fact, I eat a lot of quinoa. I boil some quinoa, put in some onions, make a nice warm soup, put some ginger in there… But I would never cook fruit or nuts or seeds. Those things always need to be eaten raw in my opinion.

I guess Mikey doesn’t know that quinoa is a seed.

T. Bruce McNeely quoting Mikey:

But I would never cook fruit or nuts or seeds. Those things always need to be eaten raw in my opinion.

So Mikey lives in South America and eats plantain raw? Yuck!

I lived in Venezuela, so we had them cut thick and fried (PlÑtanos Maduros). It is very good.

If blood transfusions transfer memories you would think fewer companies that handle proprietary information would hold blood drives. I can just imagine the board meeting at Microsoft. “We understand there was a blood drive at Apple,” the manager says pulling out a knife. “So, who’s gonna take one for the team?”

Mmmm….maduros πŸ™‚

Yes, it has entered Florida cuisine, much to our great pleaure.

It’s hilarious that these enzyme know-it-alls presume a superior knowledge of nutrition, yet don’t know that enzymes are proteins which are denatured by gastric acid

I’ve seen one “plant enzymes help digestion” raw-foodist claim that some denatured plant enzymes will spontaneously re-fold into their original shape once the stomach acids are neutralized in the intestines.

I was under the impression that proteases such as trypsin will digest proteins whether they are denatured or not. At least I thought this is what my mass spec friends had indicated. So even if the enzymes could refold after passing through the stomach wouldn’t they likely just get digested like everything else?

@53 Hmm, I see that Steve Jobs got his liver from a Tennesee transplant program. I wonder what sort of questions the donor screen for that one involved? “Blood type?” “Favorite color of mock turtleneck?”

And perhaps someone can check whether he’s been loading more country music on his iPod since the transplant?…

Orac :

Not that that stops Adams from spraying burning stupid hither and yon over his readers like napalm, or perhaps the way Marines used to aim their flamethrowers into Japanese pillboxes on Guadalcanal back in 1943 in order to incinerate the defenders. Only in this case, it’s Adams sticking the nozzle of his flamethrower of burning stupid into your ear and incinerating your brain. It’s about the only thing he’s good at besides lying.

And I reply with: Orac is like the sniper popping the flammenwerfer truppen in the pressure tank, which is how one deals with flamethrower troops.

@42 Dangerous Bacon

“Reminds me of the time I came across the recipe for live goose (put goose inside a ring of fire with lots of apple sauce)”

This sounds like Johnny Cash on drugs.

Do you mean that you would be listening to Johnny Cash, while you are taking drugs; You would be listening to Johnny Cash, recorded while he was taking drugs, or both?

And, to remain on topic, are these synthetic drugs or natural drugs? Are the doses homeopathic or real?

I’m guessing that ring of fire is not a reference to a copper allergy affecting his ring finger.

I flipped the “side” of the flamethrower guy from the USMC to the Wehrmacht, because I like the idea of Orac being on the side of the goodguys, but historically it’s still good — Germany was the only other power to use flamethrowers in any large numbers.

Memories from blood transfusions?

I have donated a lot of blood. Does that mean that I am creating a bunch of Rogue Medic zombies, who share my thoughts?

This is even better than explaining science to people – I just infuse my thoughts into their blood. But I have big, big thoughts. Maybe they cannot cross the blood/brain barrier.

Maybe, if I have a bunch of little thoughts, they can cross the blood/brain barrier, and assemble on the other side into big, big thoughts. MwaHaHaHaHa!

Do flying monkeys receive blood transfusions.

On the food vitality thing, I once had a partner that was advised by a woo peddler to give up root veges because:

“They grow in the ground, and will ground out your aura”

Man, it was no carrots or spuds for a while until the next fad came in, ‘remote healing’.

…chronic disease always has a cause and that most of the time, that cause has everything to do with nutritional deficiencies, exposure to toxic chemicals and a lack of exercise.

Ah yes, the old “blame the patient” routine.

Also very handy when your miracle cure fails to work – they just didn’t want to get better.

@Joe Schwarcz

He is the village idiot in a village of village idiots.

I have never heard this before. I am so going to use it.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: