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AutismOne 2013: A quackfest just as quacky as ever

Well, April is over, which means that Autism Awareness Month is almost over. While antivaccinationists are saying goodbye to April and whining about the very concept of “autism awareness,” I can’t help but realize that the autism quackfest known as AutismOne is less than a month away. Yes, every year around Memorial Day weekend, the glitterati of the autism quackery and antivaccine world descend upon an airport near Chicago’s O’Hare airport (what a drag, given that it can take an hour to get to downtown from there at rush hour) in order to spin conspiracy theories about big pharma and the government, learn about the latest quackery (or simply regurgitate long-existing quackery), and in general think of new ways to subject autistic children to the risk of being unprotected against vaccine-preventable diseases and subjecting them to whatever the quackery de l’année is. (Last year, it was bleach enemas, promoted by a woman named Kerri Rivera. Remembering last year’s quackfest as one of the quackiest that I can recall, I thought I’d take a look at what sort of quackery we can expect in the 2013 AutismOne quackfest.

Before I get to that, I can’t help but point out something that totally cracked me up. I rather suspect it will make you crack up too. Just take a gander at this session, Challenging the Consensus Through Effective Advocacy. Now take a look at who’s giving the talk. That’s right. I kid you not (and apparently the organizers of AutismOne aren’t kidding either). It’s Jake Crosby, and here’s a description of what he’s going to talk about:

This talk will answer questions about how you can become a more effective advocate. Discussions will range from tips and tricks for challenging people publicly at their own venues to tracking down the connections of those who defend the vaccine lobby but don’t disclose their ties. Effective narratives for countering the vaccine lobby’s talking points will also be explored.

Apparently Jake’s going to talk about how he stalks various scientists and skeptical bloggers like myself, making a pest of himself, trying to get a reaction and then blog a one-sided version of the goings-on. Then he’s going to talk about doing hilarious “six-degrees-of-separation” conspiracy mongering posts in which he spins any connection, no matter how tenuous, into an irretrievable conflict of interest. Quite honestly, I couldn’t stop laughing when I saw this.

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s take a look. It’s hard not to notice immediately who the keynote speakers are. There’s model turned comedienne turned antivaccine “warrior mother,” Jenny McCarthy, of course. No surprise there. She’s done the keynote for this particular quackfest every year of its existence, as far as I can tell. Then there’s Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Now there’s a blast from the past. Long time readers of this blog might remember that I first made a name for myself in the skeptical and science-based blogosphere when I first deconstructed an awful antivaccine article by RFK, Jr. way, way, way back in 2005. It makes me feel old just thinking about it. I mean, over eight years in the blogsophere is ancient. Apparently in 2013, he’s going to talk about Chronicling the Dangers and Exposing the Cover Up:

Has been involved in the fight to hold government health agencies responsible for the vaccine-induced autism epidemic. Kennedy’s article Deadly Immunity chronicled the cover up by the CDC and FDA blasting the agencies for putting politics before science. He comes to the conference with a new book that further exposes the dangers of thimerosal and ongoing corruption of the CDC.

Oh, goody. I wonder if I can get a review copy. I hadn’t realized that RFK, Jr. was coming out with a book this year and that he was going to exhume the rotting corpse of thimerosal antivaccine pseudoscience.

After the keynote speech by RFK, Jr., the quackery comes fast and furious. For instance, Kerry Rivera, the woman who advocates subjecting autistic children to bleach enemas, will be back for an encore performance, and apparently she’s doubling down on the bleach quackery:

What are the scientifically validated underlying causes of autism that suggest efficacy of chlorine dioxide, and what is the protocol that has helped 86 children to recovery? Underlying medical conditions are implicated in autism–infections, allergies, inflammation, etc. Chlorine dioxide combined with the other steps of the protocol has helped thousands of children in over 40 countries overcome many of these conditions.

So, a year later, Rivera has learned nothing. (I was half tempted to say, “You know nothing, Kerri Rivera,” but I’m not female, red-headed, or pretty, although I am definitely a Game of Thrones addict.) She’s still advocating feeding autistic children bleach, and I bet she’s still advocating bleach enemas as well. There is a bit of good news there. It turns out that in 2013 Rivera will graduate to become a homeopath. I can’t help but hope that she sticks to homeopathy. AT least giving out magic water won’t cause the damage that making autistic children drink bleach and or shoot it up their rectums has the potential to do.

Speaking of homeopathy, there’s lots of homeopathy at the quackfest. For example, there are three talks or roundtables on homeopathy: Sequential Homeopathy + Biomedical Science = Houston Homeopathy Method for Autism by two homeopaths from—you guessed it!—the Homeopathy Center of Houston; the Homeopathy Center of Houston Parent Roundtable; and Restoring Gut Integrity After Iatrogenic Enterocolitis: Regeneration Using Silver Hydrosol, Homeopathy, Probiotics by Robert Scott Bell.

Egads! If it’s not bleach, then it’s colloidal silver. That’s what Silver Hydrosol is! Of course, if bleach enemas, homeopathy, and colloidal silver aren’t enough for you, you can always try to treat autism with camel’s milk.

Then there’s Brian Hooker, who will apparently repeat his nonsense to an adoring audience ready to eat it up in More Lies of the CDC Regarding the Relationship between Vaccines and Autism. One can only hope he will be as hilarious in person as he is in print attacking science. Meanwhile Mayer Eisenstein will be promoting his same, tired, old antivaccine schtick, in which he tries to teach parents how to get out of the various school vaccine mandates. In fact, there’s a whole program about legal issues in autism and autism quackery, particularly getting vaccine exemptions, which is, of course, a special obsession with the antivaccine movement. If there’s one thing they hate, it’s school vaccine mandates.

If that’s not enough, the “Conspiracy Realist” Liam Scheff will tell attendees what he thinks are the The Myths of Modern Science and Medicine:

What’s wrong with science today? Investigator Liam Scheff takes apart the hidden history of medicine to reveal what’s hidden beneath centuries of propaganda. “Are vaccines really safe?” is a question too many people have had to answer in the most painful way – but it’s only a small part of the wide-reaching medical problem, revealed in this lecture.

I must admit that, after perusing Scheff’s website, I find it to be what you might call a “target-rich” environment. I mean, just check out his section on evolution, particularly his piece on How Life Came to Be. Let me tell you, I might have to revisit Liam Scheff sometime. Pure entertainment for skeptics, like a chew toy for a dog. Oh, and he’s a 9/11 Truther too. He’ll definitely fit right in at AutismOne.

Yes, it looks as though AutismOne will in 2013 will be every bit the quackfest that it’s always been, complete with book signings from a bunch of antivaccinationists pushing a book, including Louise Kuo Habakus, Kerry Rivera, and Robert Melillo, among others.

By Orac

Orac is the nom de blog of a humble surgeon/scientist who has an ego just big enough to delude himself that someone, somewhere might actually give a rodent's posterior about his copious verbal meanderings, but just barely small enough to admit to himself that few probably will. That surgeon is otherwise known as David Gorski.

That this particular surgeon has chosen his nom de blog based on a rather cranky and arrogant computer shaped like a clear box of blinking lights that he originally encountered when he became a fan of a 35 year old British SF television show whose special effects were renowned for their BBC/Doctor Who-style low budget look, but whose stories nonetheless resulted in some of the best, most innovative science fiction ever televised, should tell you nearly all that you need to know about Orac. (That, and the length of the preceding sentence.)

DISCLAIMER:: The various written meanderings here are the opinions of Orac and Orac alone, written on his own time. They should never be construed as representing the opinions of any other person or entity, especially Orac's cancer center, department of surgery, medical school, or university. Also note that Orac is nonpartisan; he is more than willing to criticize the statements of anyone, regardless of of political leanings, if that anyone advocates pseudoscience or quackery. Finally, medical commentary is not to be construed in any way as medical advice.

To contact Orac: [email protected]

716 replies on “AutismOne 2013: A quackfest just as quacky as ever”

Jake Crosby was originally slated to appear with Mark Blaxill, Dan Olmsted, and Kim Stagliano during the “Age of Autism: Where Do We Go From Here” presentation on the morning of Saturday, May 25. Then his name disappeared last week. I wonder if it has anything to do with Crosby’s continued rants against the group SafeMinds on *Age of Autism*’s comment threads.

Hooker and Blaxill, who were at each other’s throats during the SafeMinds/Crosby mess, are also slated to appear on stage together on Friday, May 24 for a talk entitled, “An Update on Congress, Autism, and VICP.” Their interaction on this panel may get interesting.

Ugh, nearly FraudismOne time already?

I wonder if Jake will use his 6DOS prattle to disclose his links to Monsanto?

As for colloidal silver and MMS, are these idiots trying to change their broken faery changelings “vaccine injured” kids into autistic smurfs with bleachy,clean digestive tracts?

Sick, demented muppets.

@Orac – giving him his own session may be part of the attempt to further distance him from the core leadership group – since he’ll be on display in all his “glory” but not directly associated or sitting with the “inner circle” – as mentioned by SJ above.

Not that there are many, if any, rational people at that event to get the fact that Jake is going to put his “stalking” tactics out there for the entire world to see…..

Gah. Colloidal silver.

AV’ers scream about the heavy metals (OMG Aluminum! OMG MERCURY!) in vaccines, but have no problem dosing their kiddos up with ANOTHER heavy metal, silver.

Yes yes, silver has antibacterial/antimicrobial functions – especially when used topically. Giving it internally? That’s a really dumb idea. Giving them NANOSILVER internally?

That’s damn moronic.

I work in an industry that makes chlorine dioxide for water treatment systems. Every so often we get a request to purchase chlorite, a key ingredient, in bulk from an odd source. We turn them down flat as our corporate ethics prevent us from distributing dangerous chemicals to loons.

BTW, our equipment is often shipped with gas detectors for safety. If chlorine dioxide gas is detected above 0.1 ppm, we sound an alarm and turn on exhaust fans. I wonder what Rivera’s safety precautions include? “Hold your breath dear while we pump more bleach up your ass?”

@elburto

Darn it! You beat me to the smurf joke. Since anti-vaxxers (based on available evidence) don’t view their children as little rays of sunshine, I guess they would at least like a little ball of blueberry.

Well, if they want their bundle of joy turned into a ball of blueberry, I’m sure Mr Wonka’s chocolate factory has just the product.

@Martin

“I wouldn’t do that. I really wouldn’t.”

and my favorite line:

“Stop. Don’t. Come back.”

Effective. You keep using that word, Jake. I do not think it means what you think it means…

our corporate ethics prevent us from distributing dangerous chemicals to loons

“Corporate ethics” is one of those phrases which can fry cheap irony meters, but yes, I’d hate to be the defendant when one of the neighbors sues. Shipping hazardous materials in bulk to a residential address is not only asking for trouble, but sending an engraved invitation.

I e-mailed the NBC and CBS affiliates in Chicago asking them to do investigative reports on Rivera and MMS. Considering MMS has been subject to a warning by the FDA and several foreign health agencies, I figured a quackster from Mexico shilling a transparently dangerous product in Chicagoland would warrant such reports. Let us keep fingers crossed.

Autistics — you know, actual human beings with autism — are pretty much done with “awareness” also. Awareness is cheap, easy, often degrading, and does little-to-nothing to meet actual needs.

So there were several efforts to change the conversation. Autism Acceptance Decade, for one. (Google it, as I want to use my one free link for something else)

Autism Positivity for another. My current favorite of the day’s Flash Blog is by Rose of the Caffeinated Autistic

Today is Autism Positivity day, and I’m going to tell you the best things about being autistic, for me.

“…. and I’m going to tell you the best things about being autistic, for me.”

http://autismpositivity.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/the-caffeinated-autistic-celebrates-1000-ausome-things-autismpositivity2013/

@Eric:

Pool chemicals are also ingredients in various home made explosives (HME), As an FBI instructor told my IED class*, HME tends to be a self-resolving problem.

But yes, it is hard on the neighbors.

(*I love my job).

I must admit that, after perusing Scheff’s website, I find it to be what you might call a “target-rich” environment. I mean, just check out his section on evolution, particularly his piece on How Life Came to Be.

Oh crap, he’s an ‘electric universe’ freak.

He does admit most of his ideas are untestable, but shies away from stating that they are also unevidenced.

Rich Woods @16 — The Electric Universe folks? Yowza! I’m an astronomer, so I’ve taken a little more interest in this phenomenon that the typical Orac reader.

Most people don’t know much about all that esoteric stuff that goes on beyond the top of the atmosphere, so the sheer depth of the Electric Universe people’s ludicrosity tends to be lost on the non-specialist.

Their theories are monomaniacal and unphysical, and as one might expect, they have no idea whatsoever of … well, almost anything, but I was going to stress that they have no idea of how the theories we tend to trust are supported by reams and reams of superb data collected over many years.

In other words, it’s pure, concentrated, highly-refined crankery.

That Liam Scheff is a real specimen! According to his web site, the Boston Marathon bombings were a covert CIA plot!

A few things:

Scheff has a long history as an hiv/aids denialist.

-btw- I didn’t see any TMR lounge meet-ups; there was also supposed to be a Saturday book event w/ MacNeil for their new entry in the woo chick-lit derby.

AND….
now while I do honestly and sincerely confess to being both a bad influence and agent provocateur
BUT
as a rejoinder to what our most esteemed and totally gracious host ( with the most), Orac, said recently:
( paraphrase) it’s not OK to bother Jake at his presentation @ GWU but if he gives a speech publicly, it’s fair game to question him as he does others.

Well, this is public. Not related to his university. He’s putting himself out there (both figuratively and literally) so, Why not?

Some brave soul might be highly effective in giving him a taste of his own medicine ( although if it’s a SBM’er, he or she would therefore be showing data, not Jakes brand of rumour mongering/ conspiratorial yapping/ ranting at whomsoever he disagrees with) whilst his adoring fans observe.

It’s just an idea:
but it would have to be someone who is relatively calm, knows his or her stuff and isn’t recognisable by appearance or ‘nym: might be required to register by name/ photo ID might get kicked out etc.

I think it would be hilarious to turn the tables on him.

Also coming up is this cancer quackfest:
http://www.cancercontrolsociety.org/meeting2013-html.html
Hoxsey, laetrile, chelation, Mexican clinics — it’s all here!

It is as if the resident Napoleons and Christs from every asylum in the US gathered at a conference to commiserate with one another about the reluctance of the outside world to recognise each one’s true identity.

@ herr doktor bimler:

Ever read ” The Three Christs of Ypsilanti”?

I’m female, red-headed (at the mo) and if you squint really hard, in a darkened room I *might* be pretty. You know nothing, kerri riverra!

from AoA today: “May Day! May Day!…” ( Dachel)

Cindy Griffin comment:
Orac’s “attacks on the parents who have dared to try to bring the SHAME of Big Pharma, and the PAIN and SUFFERING of autism to public attention”
and, ” I honestly hope that there is also a very special warm place in hell for the ‘oracs’ of the world…”
She tries to recover children…
She could sue O but won’t.
Etc.

Also, AoA:
LIsa Goes ( TMR’s Rev) relates her two dreams ( in purple prose) and then announces that she will vacate the premises until she is again worthy blah, blah, blah.

Cindy Griffin comment:
Orac’s “attacks on the parents who have dared to try to bring the SHAME of Big Pharma, and the PAIN and SUFFERING of autism to public attention”

I find myself wondering what AoA have contributed to ‘autism awareness’ other than to pretend that 25 years ago it didn’t exist.

@ Denice,

It seem really personal to them (blame, special place in h*ll for Orac…). Some days, I really question why do I go there myself.

Alain

Orac: On behalf of all parents of autistic children, I thank you for your good work. Cindy Griffin does not speak for me or for my child. Please keep up your good work, exposing the liars and quacks who victimize autistic children with dangerous and unnecessary (mis-)treatments.

@ Alain:

I’m not a masochist: I survey material like this because I truly want to understand them so I can counter their advocacy to neutral people.

We have data and research BUT when a new parent hears another parent in the throes of pain, crying about their ‘damaged’ child who was ‘destroyed’ by the malfeasance of greedy doctors etc. well, parents are vulnerable to messages like these- there is a natural sympathy that they feel while simultaneously experiencing fears about all of the terrible things that can befall children.

@ lilady:
Isn’t it nice to know that we’re all on the road to hell- which is of course, paved with good intentions.?

@ Orac:

It’s in her comment on Dachel’s May Day post.
-btw- she doesn’t d-mn you ( us?) but only hopes for it.

@ Orac @ Denice Walter:

http://www.ageofautism.com/2013/05/may-day-may-day-the-end-of-autism-acceptance-month.html

“…There must be a very special place in Heaven for the children and families who have been sentenced to a miserable existence from vaccines. And while it goes against my personal Christian belief system to do so, I honestly hope there is also a very special warm place in hell for the “oracs” of the world who try to hide their nastiness and the source thereof behind internet monikers, and make unveiled attempts to destroy the reputations and credentials of those who try to help the victims. (Dr. Wakefield certainly comes to mind!) Orac must be very proud of himself. For a little time. But there is an eternity ahead.”

***I’ll have good company in that “special warm place in hell”. 🙂

Amen @Thomas.

Ah yes, Lilady. I remember that one. Haven’t seen that study in a while. In fact, I haven’t seen many of the usual ones that get recycled now and then. The pro-disease pages are all full of St Andy’s ranting on YouTube.

@ lilady:

In hell, every nacht is Walpurgisnacht.
Woo hoo.

Isn’t it nice to know that we’re all on the road to hell

And if you meet the Buddha WAIT wrong metaphor.

Isn’t it nice to know that we’re all on the road to hell

I like the Talking Heads’ version.

Or a long time in Heck, anyway. Thanks Liz D for the comment on Autism Positivity day. That must be why my nephew posted a photo of him holding and Autism Society banner from St. Pat’s day.

If a homeopath damns you to hell, does that mean you get fire and brimstone diluted until there’s none left?

“who try to hide their nastiness and the source thereof behind internet monikers”

Damn you Orac! If only someone could pierce the thick veil of secrecy and discover your real name!

“…There must be a very special place in Heaven for the children and families who have been sentenced to a miserable existence from vaccines. And while it goes against my personal Christian belief system to do so, I honestly hope there is also a very special warm place in hell for the “oracs” of the world who try to hide their nastiness and the source thereof behind internet monikers, and make unveiled attempts to destroy the reputations and credentials of those who try to help the victims. (Dr. Wakefield certainly comes to mind!) Orac must be very proud of himself. For a little time. But there is an eternity ahead.”

Oh, the hilarity, particularly the part where she says:

I’m even capable of suing him for defamation but it’s not worth the effort. I’d rather devote my energy to finding more and better ways to safely fix the kids, thank you very much.

Sure she is. I was merely expressing my opinion that homeopathy is quackery and that AutismOne is a quackfest. Free speech.

Of course, Ms. Griffin could try to make the case that homeopathy is effective, that it isn’t the pseudoscience that I believe it to be, but she can’t. Instead she’d rather whine about how she could sue and say she”s way too busy helping people to bother with such negativity. I did have a nice chuckle, though, and I suppose I should thank her for that. It warms the cockles of my heart to know that my efforts are so appreciated.

Look at those impressive letters after her name..

http://www.homeopathyhouston.com/practitioners/cindy-l-griffin/

She’s also an educator/founder of her own school of homeopathy:

“After starting an Affiliated Study Group under National Center of Homeopathy in 1998, some of her students began asking for more in-depth teaching of homeopathy. By 1999 Cindy had created Houston School of Homeopathy, teaching beginning classes in homeopathic self-care. In 2001 she added a two-year practitioner level foundational course and graduated its first class in May, 2003. She has developed a curriculum in foundational studies for practitioners which will be taught in Houston, Texas. She has developed a two-day curriculum for acute illness and injury for consumers, a one-year basic post-graduate level course for homeopathic professional acute care, and a two-year advanced, post-graduate curriculum in the Houston Homeopathy Method, as well as a 1 year clinical internship program through Homeopathy Center of Houston.”

I have never studied homeopathy. Therefore I’m an expert. My knowledge is more potent than those who attended classes.

I’m even capable of suing him for defamation

Anyone can sue, just as anyone can call spirits from the vasty deep; the issue is the likelihood of being thrown out of court.

Homeopathy for “acute illness and injury”?

That’s IT, I’m already in Hell, I must be. Bleurgh.

If there is a hell then it’ll probably be really interesting, with some truly fascinating company. I bet the food is good too, and the entertainment? Well they do say that the Devil has all the best music.

Heaven, OTOH, seems like a Cliff Richard and Daniel O’Donnell drenched place. Even the thought has made me grab for the prochlorperazine*.

Last of the Summer Wine and Songs of Praise playing on repeat on all the heavenly screens, lukewarm orange squash** and dull biscuits^ like Nice or Rich Tea… Nah, hell will be just fine thanks!

Oh, and music fact fans, Chris Rea’s song ‘The Road to Hell’ is about a truly terrible local road. that’s a blackspot for both almost constant gridlock and spectacularly horrible accidents.

OME and I once drove past an accident scene (on that same road) that haunts me to this day. The juxtaposition of the sheer horror of what I saw lying there, with the banality of the bags of groceries strewn on the road by the impact, was just horribly jarring. I’m sure that even the “Thinkers” might stop referring to their situations as “horrific” or “tragic” if they’d seen that.

*Only at antiemetic doses, not antipsychotic levels! Even Cliff and Daniel don’t inspire psychotic fugue-states in me. I think…

**It’s like cordial but cheaper and weaker. Basically orangeish (or whatever) flavoured concentrate that you mix with water to create glasses of nasty. Standard fare at church events, along with…

^Biscuits as in cookies. Miserable ones devoid of well… anything. Flavour, colour, substance etc. Nice (pronounced like the French city) biscuits are pale rectangles of regret covered in granulated sugar.

Rich Tea biscuits are circles of sadness, made for dunking in cups of tea. They frequently fail to live up to even that simple duty though and break in half, rendering your cuppa undrinkable due to the sludge created by the drowned despair disc.

Apologies for the apparent addiction to alliteration. I don’t know where it’s come from, although it’s probably down to my insomnia and a week of gastric shenanigans leaving my brain addled. Yes, more so than usual!

I’m rather fond of the subtle flavour of Rich Tea biscuits, myself. (I have the good fortune to have been able to master the art of dunking them without having them disintegrate.) I’ll agree with you about Nice biscuits, though; the name is surely a violation of truth-in-advertising laws.

“OMG I should sue him!”

Please do. I need my gut-splitting belly laugh of the day.

Seriously, get your knickers out of their knot and put up or shut up – bring the science or go home already, Ms. Griffin.

They consider themselves scientists but nothing could be farther from the truth. Why solely dwell on the scientific process when you also need integrity, humility and passion for truth to deliver the goods? Who would argue that Einstein was not the greatest scientist of all? Einstein single-handedly gave us the phenomenal, revolutionary ‘theory of relatively’ without the aid of one single scientific study. He did this solely through his thought experiments. He was successful because he was the ultimate embodiment of the scientific spirit — integrity, humility and passion for truth. You only need to look at the man and you can see these things. Contrast Einstein’s scientific spirit with theirs. We have an autism epidemic that is obliterating generations of children and what solutions do they have to offer? Where are their passion and motivation to provide answers to the suffering children and their families? Instead, all we hear are lame excuses; ‘we don”t know if there is really an epidemic…we can’t do an unvaxed/vaxed study because it’s too difficult…stop asking us to investigate vaccine components because that’s shifting the goalposts…and so on and so on’. What happened to their scientific ideals of seeking truth to the betterment of mankind? Poor, pathetic, sad sacks they all are. How low they have sunk. Despicable pharma shills, they do not hesitate to prostitute themselves for mere selfish gains. They are the ultimate sell-outs. Not only did they sell-out our kids but they also sold out their own profession. History will forever judge them as the most odious excuses for scientists.

“two-year practitioner level foundational course”

What an appalling waste of two years.

Greg: ” Why solely dwell on the scientific process when you also need integrity, humility and passion for truth to deliver the goods?”

Greg (paraphrased): “Why bother with science when you need to agree with me to deliver the results I want?

‘theory of relatively’

Now that’s just embarrassing. Please troll better.

@Greg

we don”t know if there is really an epidemic

Okay, provide some citations, then, showing that there is, indeed, an epidemic. Is the prevalence high? Yes. Has it increased? Hard to say, since there are a lot of confounders that just cannot be controlled for, but evidence suggests that if it has, it hasn’t done so by much.

we can’t do an unvaxed/vaxed study because it’s too difficult

Bzzt! No, we can’t do a vaxed/unvaxed study because it would be unethical, if done in a prospective manner. If you mean a retrospective study, yes, it’s difficult, but some studies have been done already and found no connection.

stop asking us to investigate vaccine components because that’s shifting the goalposts

We have looked at some of the components (thimerosal, antigens) and specific vaccines (MMR). The anti-vaccine contingent just looks at the list of ingredients and say, “Oh, yeah? Well, what about this?” with no thought to prior plausibility, dose-response, etc. And, because there have been studies looking at vaccinated vs. partially vaccinated vs. unvaccinated and health outcomes, finding no differences between groups (other than greater rates of preventable diseases in the unvaccinated), there is no compelling evidence to keep looking at the ingredient du jour. So, yes, at this point, it is just shifting goalposts when you get an answer you don’t like.

What happened to their scientific ideals of seeking truth to the betterment of mankind?

They are seeking truth to better mankind. They are looking at genetic causal factors and other promising areas. They are also looking at ways to make the lives of autistics better, learning how to provide what they need to allow them to reach their fullest potential.

Despicable pharma shills

Really, Greg? The pharma shill gambit? Seriously?

they do not hesitate to prostitute themselves for mere selfish gains.

Such lovely imagery, Greg. Can’t fight the science, so just sling insults. Well played, sir. Well played. Your intellect astounds me. I bow low before the great mind that is Greg. Oh, Most Pompously Accurate One! I am unworthy to even glimpse the electrodes you spew into the internet!

We have an autism epidemic that is obliterating generations of children …

And once again Greg, you expose yourself as an ableist.

What happened to their scientific ideals of seeking truth to the betterment of mankind?

Please stop, i’m running out of irony and hypocrisy meters now.

are the ultimate sell-outs. Not only did they sell-out our kids but they also sold out their own profession

Fzzt…BANG another one destroyed. Your comment describes Andrew Wakefield (who took money from a lawyer to find a link, subjected children to invasive procedures, cooked the data when it pointed away from his hypothesis and attempted to set up businesses to profit from the scare he engineered) down to the ground.

@Greg – because the Science isn’t giving you the results you want / demand (because it isn’t there), you tar the entire Scientific Profession as being “corrupt?”

How about actual evidence to support any of your various assertions? Including all of the answers to the questions we’ve already asked & you’ve refused to answer.

I would love for you to go out and tell the autistic population how “brain damaged” they are…..including the ones that regularly post on here. You claim Scientists lack compassion, yet you have no problem with saying the things you do…..hypocrisy, thy name is Greg.

I don’t think what Greg is doing even falls in the same grid square as thinking…

But hey, he’s got half my anti-vaxx bingo card filled, and just from one post.

As Todd and Lawrence have pointed out, if science comes up with an answer you don’t like, it’s not proof that scientists are evil, inhuman and corrupt. It’s proof that you were wrong.

Greg,

We have an autism epidemic that is obliterating generations of children and what solutions do they have to offer? Where are their passion and motivation to provide answers to the suffering children and their families? Instead, all we hear are lame excuses; ‘we don”t know if there is really an epidemic…we can’t do an unvaxed/vaxed study because it’s too difficult…stop asking us to investigate vaccine components because that’s shifting the goalposts…and so on and so on’.

If only those heartless scientists would get off their backsides and do some research into autism. There are only 22,540 papers mentioning autism listed on PubMed, but they are mostly looking at plausible causes of autism, such as genetics, and effective interventions based on neurobiological principles that actually help people with autism. Where are the studies on implausible and tested and rejected hypotheses? Where are the studies on interventions that have no basis in science and that are likely to unhelpful at best and dangerous at worst? [/sarcastic snark]

It seems obvious to most people that there are plenty of passionate and motivated scientists doing research that is likely to actually generate useful results. Why would anyone in their right mind waste time and money investigating the disproven vaccine-autism link, or useless biochemical interventions based on crackpot ideas?

“Theory of Relativity”

– Albert Einstein

“Theory of Irrelativity”

– Greg

Hi morons,

keep injecting yourselves with poison and telling yourselves it’s shinola. I guess moms just like faking the death and brain damage of their kids to give you tards something to talk about.

Greg:

Just thinking aloud… Will address you guys shortly.

So are you finally going answer my question on vaccines versus actual diseases in regards to seizures with actual verifiable scientific evicence? Or are you going to run away again the third time I repeat the question?

Remember I dealt with real seizures due to a real disease in a toddler. I cannot go by beliefs, but actual evidence.

Greg claims:

Einstein single-handedly gave us the phenomenal, revolutionary ‘theory of relatively’ without the aid of one single scientific study. He did this solely through his thought experiments. He was successful because he was the ultimate embodiment of the scientific spirit — integrity, humility and passion for truth

False, Greg. The development of the special & general theories of relativity required a great deal of prior work be undertaken:

The history of special relativity consists of many theoretical results and empirical findings obtained by Albert Michelson, Hendrik Lorentz, Henri Poincaré and others. It culminated in the theory of special relativity proposed by Albert Einstein, and subsequent work of Max Planck, Hermann Minkowski and others. [from the fount of all knowledge]

It’s fairly obvious from this, and the remainder of your obcene rant, that you know effectively nothing about science.

By 1999 Cindy had created Houston School of Homeopathy, teaching beginning classes in homeopathic self-care

Does that mean she teaches people to drink water and take showers?

@Greg – trying to play the “maverick” science card again? As has been pointed out, Einstein wasn’t working in isolation or in conflict with the mainstream – he was a recognized expert in his field and part of a much larger body of scientists all heading in the same direction.

I will also agree that you know little about Science or History for that matter…..

Just thinking aloud…

I’d suggest you get the act down before performing in front of a live audience, greg.

Greg: “Just thinking aloud…”

Ah, so _that_ explains the weird whoopee-cushion noises…

Does that mean she teaches people to drink water and take showers?

[SNORT]

keep injecting yourselves with poison and telling yourselves it’s shinola

Does anyone understand why Mike Miller appears to think skeptics believe vaccines are made of shoe polish? No wonder he thinks we’re morons. It’s all clearly a terrible misunderstanding.

@Mike Miller,
As we keep telling Greg, you need to show us proof that vaccines do that.

@Mike Miller

Oh, Mike, Mike, Mike. Really? You shouldn’t have dropped out of troll school. Otherwise, you might have learned to be at least interesting.

Restoring Gut Integrity After Iatrogenic Enterocolitis: Regeneration Using Silver Hydrosol, Homeopathy, Probiotics by Robert Scott Bell.

I presume this must be the conference that follows “Inducing Iatrogenic Enterocolitis in the Comfort of Your Own Home Using Sodium Hypochlorite”?

Abstract: Your autistic child doesn’t have any bowel problems according to all the real doctors you’ve consulted ? Don’t despair, we now have the solution : mess them up yourself ! Our new do-it-yourself sodium hypochlorite enema is a practically guaranteed way to seriously affect your child excreting function for a long time, for hours of joy and potentially serious complications. Advantages include squeaky clean colon and interestingly smelling farts. We’ll also introduce brand new advances in our treatment in books such as The Potentializing Effect of Vinegar: The Health Benefits Of Having Exothermic Reactions Happen Inside of You.

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