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The rise of a new grief vampire

I don’t write about psychics that often. Most commonly, when I do, it’s about psychics making claims that could be construed as medical claims, such as when America’s Quack, Dr. Mehmet Oz brought psychic scammers like John Edward and the “Long Island Medium” Theresa Caputo, even going so far as to imply that psychics can actually talk to the dead and that their act can even be therapeutic for grief.

This time around, I’m learning of what is arguably the most despicable use of a psychic yet. It’s so bad that Susan Gerbic labeled this particular self-proclaimed psychic a “grief vampire,” and so he is. The psychic is, quite literally, the new kid on the block as far a psychics go; his name is Tyler Henry, and apparently the basic cable channel E! is really pushing a TV series featuring him, Hollywood Medium With Tyler Henry. His website describes him thusly:

Tyler Henry (born January 13, 1996) is a teen clairvoyant medium oringally from central California. Born with a unique gift, Tyler has helped countless people acquire closure, comfort, and proof that consciousness transcends physical death. Working as an evidential-based medium, his ability to provide specific, detail-oriented specifics has allowed him to share what he sees with medical professionals and missing person cases.

As Tyler’s grandmother was terminally ill with cancer in April of 2006, he began having strong intuitive hunches that would later turn into a series of profound visions that proved to be true. After a series of life changing events (including a near death experience), Tyler’s passion, calling, and life purpose has been to bring clarity, closure, and evidence to those he is privileged to read.

Marvelous. The next generation of psychic scammers is here, led by a handsome, boyish-looking 20 year old who is being advertised as three, three, three psychic scammers in one. First, he claims to be a medium, claiming that he can communicate with the dead. Second, he claims to be a clairvoyant, implying that he can predict the future. Third, and finally, he claims to be a “medical intuitive,” defined as having the “innate ability to describe the cause of a physical or emotional condition through the perception or feeling of another’s energy.” E!’s website claims that while performing a reading, “Tyler can often physically sense the prior medical conditions of the spirits he is attempting to communicate with.”

OK, I know what you’re thinking. So what? This guy is just another in a long line of psychic scammers. He’s young. He’s charismatic. He’s telegenic. In other words, he’s like a young John Edward and perfect for television. What’s the harm? It’s just entertainment, right? Well, it is entertainment, but it’s far from harmless, as Susan Gerbic points out:

Reading more, I stop and hold my breath. Here it is. The part that makes it clear whether he is a psychic entertainer who is up-front about his act or just another grief vampire. Henry tells the interviewer his goal for the future. It is to work with parents who have lost their children to suicide. I can feel my blood pressure increasing and the hackles on the back of my neck starting to rise. He isn’t just a grief vampire; he is aspiring to be one of the most despicable types of grief vampires, tying for first place with those who work as psychic detectives. These are the people who prey on families when they are the most desperate and vulnerable. I’m appalled that he thinks this is something to aspire to. Something to be proud of!

Indeed. This is the sort of thing that makes my skin crawl. It is at this point that I can’t help but point out that psychics aren’t the only kind of grief vampires. Cancer quacks are a particularly despicable form of the monster. They prey on the grief and desperation of cancer patients; psychics prey on the grief of those who’ve lost loved ones. Sylvia Browne used to be among the most despicable of these, but there are many others who haven’t achieved national or international prominence who function similarly. Worse, there exists an entertainment industry that promotes them. Henry will be on Dr. Phil’s show today, and you might remember that Dr. Phil has fallen for a psychics before.

Gerbic makes an observation about Henry that I thought of as soon as I learned of him: Where did this guy come from? I had never heard of him before. He seems to have appeared out of nowhere! He already has a show. The hollywood hype machine is promoting his show. He’s all over Twitter and Facebook. There are articles in the entertainment press about him and, of course, ads for his new television series. Clearly, a fair amount of marketing muscle is being placed in the service of his show, complete with bits showing him doing readings on various celebrities. There are interviews like this:

It looks as though there’s some editing there, but I don’t see anything that doesn’t look like a combination of your basic run-of-the-mill cold reading with an awkwardly scripted conversation. But, hey, Tyler’s a skeptic, ma-an:

Lots of people feel either that [my gift needs] to be proven or that, on a personal level, they need the validation that their loved one is ok. Some people come to readings with a ‘prove-it-to-me’ mentality and others come with an openness.

I do inherently understand both sides. I think it’s important to have a healthy degree of skepticism. I myself am a very skeptical person. In readings, my goal is to bring up information that there really is no way I could know. I don’t like saying general things. I don’t like saying information that everybody knows. I focus on information that can’t be researched or googled, and that usually includes inside jokes or sentimental pieces of information that only families really know.

As Gerbic mentions, this sounds like something that should be fairly easy to test. If Henry really is a skeptic, surely he’s be up for a carefully designed and controlled test of his “powers.” Somehow, I doubt that’s going to happen any time soon. More likely, at some point, if his show takes off (which is, of course, by no means a given) he’ll get someone like Dr. Oz or Dr. Phil to “test” him, and you know how worthless that will be.

Both Steve Novella and Susan Gerbic ask the question: Does Henry believe in his ability? Is he nothing more than a scammer or is he just a misguided young man who, by whatever means, has come to believe that he possesses special “gifts”? I tend to agree with Novella on this one: Practically, it doesn’t really matter. Moreover, it’s likely that there is a spectrum along which psychics exist from pure scammer to pure believer, with most of them falling somewhere between. It doesn’t really matter that much where on that spectrum Henry falls. What matters is what he does.

It might well be that, as long as Henry restricts himself to doing readings on celebrities for his show, all he’s doing is harmless entertainment. The problem is that we already know he isn’t restricting himself to that. He already advertises private bookings on his own website. (We don’t know how much he charges because that isn’t listed.) He has stated that he wants to “help” parents whose children have committed suicide, and no doubt before too long he will do that. Likely the producer of his show is looking for such grieving parents right now, fodder for the grief vampire, to be shown for the morbid entertainment of the masses.

By Orac

Orac is the nom de blog of a humble surgeon/scientist who has an ego just big enough to delude himself that someone, somewhere might actually give a rodent's posterior about his copious verbal meanderings, but just barely small enough to admit to himself that few probably will. That surgeon is otherwise known as David Gorski.

That this particular surgeon has chosen his nom de blog based on a rather cranky and arrogant computer shaped like a clear box of blinking lights that he originally encountered when he became a fan of a 35 year old British SF television show whose special effects were renowned for their BBC/Doctor Who-style low budget look, but whose stories nonetheless resulted in some of the best, most innovative science fiction ever televised, should tell you nearly all that you need to know about Orac. (That, and the length of the preceding sentence.)

DISCLAIMER:: The various written meanderings here are the opinions of Orac and Orac alone, written on his own time. They should never be construed as representing the opinions of any other person or entity, especially Orac's cancer center, department of surgery, medical school, or university. Also note that Orac is nonpartisan; he is more than willing to criticize the statements of anyone, regardless of of political leanings, if that anyone advocates pseudoscience or quackery. Finally, medical commentary is not to be construed in any way as medical advice.

To contact Orac: [email protected]

108 replies on “The rise of a new grief vampire”

I can´t say I lke the term “grief vampire”, vampires are seen much too positive in today´s cultural context. “Ghoul” would be a much more appropriate term for such people

I find this class of thing especially infuriating: in my professional life I worked extensively with those who had made an attempt at suicide and also with complex grief reactions. These are complicated and messy areas requiring some very careful handling, not this sort of exploitative bovine manure.

As an aside, anyone who has experience of and skills at interviewing people for a living can get a large amount of information out of people without them quite realising how you did it, even when they might have decided they would not talk about that area: I did this regularly…And I was merely an experienced MH nurse, no super powers…

“Some people come to readings with a ‘prove-it-to-me’ mentality and others come with an openness”

‘Prove it to me’ IS an openness.

grief vampire

For some reason, I’m stuck thinking of a episode of the BPRD comic book (an Hellboy spin-off), the one where Johann Kraus, the resident spirit medium, explains how he once abused a customer’s trust by encouraging him to keep coming for more séances so he (the medium) could keep meeting in the astral plane the ghost/soul of the customer’s dead wife.
It lasted until the customer, wracked with fresh grief at every seance, could not take it anymore and angrily walked out.

There is not much relevance with Tyler Henry and his likes, aside from the fact, already pointed by Murmur, that grief could be a powerfully debilitating emotion and should be handled carefully, not used to manipulate others.

I’m actually more afraid by the fact it’s going to be a TV show. A private séance – one can hope the medium doesn’t want to end up with customers on suicide watch. A TV show, on the other hand… The more emotions, the more frictions, the more drama, the better.

Dreadful.

Reminds me of the novelty song “Teenage Brain Surgeon” beloved by Dr. Demento, and sung by some freakishly low contra-bass —

I was a teenage brain surgeon
Teenage brain surgeon,
The sharpest operator in town

#5 Adam
Yet another fledging conman given a platform by TV and let loose on the world.

Yes, I used to think that the most easily conned people were salesmen (or other conmen) but TV personalities seem to be taking the lead.

I wonder if this implies a similar personality type across the groups?

^ Oops, that was a bit ambiguous. I meant con men conning con men not that salesmen were con men.

re Ms Caputo

She’s a fake.
How do I know this?

If she really were in communication with the spirits of the dead, she would be harangued into madness by shades of deceased fashion designers and icons who would shriek unceasingly after encountering her ‘look’.

And if she had more interpersonal savvy, she would be able to figure out what living fashionistas were thinking when they viewed her choices and thus, clean up her act.

Tyler rocks the boy band look in order to interest/ entice teenaged girls, millennials and their mothers.

Where did he come from? A PR firm, Hollywood agent, stage mom?

[email protected]: You remind me of the joke told by comedian in the 1980s (I forget which one). He calls the Psychic Friends hotline, and the first thing they do is ask for his credit card number. That’s how he knows they’re fake: if they were real psychics, they would either know it already, or be able to read his mind as he holds the card in front of him.

As for whence young Mr. Tyler came: Follow the money. Somebody thinks there is a profit to be made.

With all his claimed abilities, this vulture should be able to prevent teen suicides instead of merely exploit them for fame and profit.

Scum. Pure scum. Either because he’s lying about what he can do, or because he could actually do some good but won’t. Odds of the former: 100%.

It’s all fun and games until you realize that Tyler predicted this article from Orac.

“As Tyler’s grandmother was terminally ill with cancer in April of 2006, he began having strong intuitive hunches that would later turn into a series of profound visions that proved to be true. After a series of life changing events (including a near death experience), Tyler’s passion, calling, and life purpose has been to bring clarity, closure, and evidence to those he is privileged to read.”

How psychic can you be if you can’t predict the future well enough to AVOID your own “near death experience”? Didn’t he see this coming??

@ Denice Walter

she would be harangued into madness by shades

I suspect that, if dead people were able to speak with us, the conversation’s tone would indeed be rather less peaceful and less polite than the usual “spirit medium speaking in a toneless voice” cliché.

Where did he come from?

I have a few hypotheses. The one involving a bite by a radioactive badger seems far-fetched, tough. I’m not sure that badgers are carrion eaters.

Hardly as ghoulish as religious-right preachers who had parents believing that their gay sons and daughters who died of AIDS or suicide were burning in hell and deserved it.

What this kid is doing is making claims of supernatural knowledge to people who have suffered a suicide in the family, which is no different than what clergy members do in religious services and in counseling family members after loved ones die.

Where I would draw a hard line is if the kid is offering medical advice to people with dangerous illnesses. At that point he would deserve to be prosecuted along with all the other quacks and frauds in the zoo.

I would also draw a hard line if he was setting himself up as a charismatic leader in a cult that used brainwashing tactics, such as the Moonies, though that’s far more difficult to prosecute unless “members” are being sexually or otherwise physically abused, or held against their will.

But supernatural blah-blah as emotional palliative? Meh. The shadiest aspect of that is that he’s on TV, and it doesn’t take ESP to predict that his show will probably go nowhere.

But even that’s hardly as goulish as those horrid daytime shows such as “Maury” where minor children are routinely traumatized on stage before the cameras and live audiences, as their parents fight over adulterous affairs. I once caught a glimpse of that on a TV in a medical office, and wanted to reach through the tube and (redacted, redacted!).

It is to work with parents who have lost their children to suicide.

I think he’d be far more useful in suicide prevention: I know I would find punching that face all day incredibly therapeutic.

I had an experience where a ( possibly disturbed) person was trying very hard to convince me- I have no idea why- that she knew my parents well and that I was too young at the time to remember her.

I knew that she was lying because everything she discussed was knowable at the present time or apparent by other means. For example, she discussed a building where they used to live as it appeared in the recent past- not decades ago. I asked her questions like ( she claimed remembering a large tree) , “What was next to the tree?” ( She didn’t know that actually a large summer house was there until 30 years ago) I asked her what my father looked like- which led to much hedging not a description- when really I look very related to him- most people say I look like him or his mother – that is, most people who KNEW them.

That’s what these ‘psychics’ are doing in order to gain power over people or get their money.

I couldn’t hold it in, I had to go to his Facebook page and ask if he’ll be putting his magic powers to the test with James Randi’s million dollar challenge. After all, he do so much good for the world with that million.

There is another possibly more deadly component to the danger of his talking to youth who have committed suicide as a way of consoling parents. In Jennifer Michael Hecht’s book “Stay”, a major component is her argument that suicide is often a future murder, as a large number of people who attempt suicide have known friend(s) and or relatives who have committed suicide and this makes it easier to take such action. (I am over-simplifying Hecht’s premise)

My fear is that, with such a charismatic persona, Henry is going to inspire already troubled young people to kill themselves.

I give you these thoughts from my compendium of great advice:
I never cheated an honest man, only rascals. They wanted something for nothing. I gave them nothing for something. – Joseph “Yellow Kid” Weil

A grifter will also exploit his victim’s virtues. – Rich Marotta

The Yellow Kid was so good at what he did that the detective who finally was able to make the arrest and get the conviction was driving him to prison and Weill sold him $30,000 in bogus stock.
00 of bogus stuck from him.

PSYCHIC’S ARE FOR REAL. Sad that so many people can only see this world as 3 dimensional. Open up your mind and go to one. It will change your life. PS. My beautiful, 19 year old daughter committed suicide and I’m okay with it because I know that she is still with me just not in the physical sense. <3

Sorry about the orphan line on my previous post. My browser visited a few too many vineyard sites today.

Saw this today in passing.

The kid should have a show called “Medium Gay”, but I don’t know if he’s out. Not that there’s anything wrong with him being gay, I just think that’d be a fun title for a horrible exploitative show.

He’s out. You obviously didn’t click all the links. 🙂

I intentionally didn’t mention that Tyler Henry is gay because I didn’t consider it relevant to what I was writing about. It doesn’t matter to me.

Yeah, I don’t care if he’s gay. That’s not a problem. I was just thinking they could use it in his branding.

How about “Queer Eye For The Dead Guy” ?

Psychics make me angry. My sister came back from one in a state of near-hysteria once. She had asked the nasty fraud if my mother’s next trip abroad would be good, and the “psycho” responded that my mom wouldn’t come back, which we interpreted as she would die during the trip. Insanely, this “psycho” provided tape recordings of her “readings”. My sister kept repeating “Why would anyone say something like that?”

I have two theories – my sister was deliberately not volunteering information for the psycho (to test her “abilities”), and the psycho wanted to punish her for that.
Secondly – the psycho suggested that my sister visit her again and they might be able to forestall this death – a con – milk someone for more money. We probably should have gone to the police.

It was disgusting. That was about 20 years ago and my mom is approaching her 81st birthday. So much for psycho psychics.

Doesn’t really matter what he thinks of his own ability but after watching his “reading” of Jamie Pressly, I’d be hard pressed to believe that this isn’t a deliberate con down to the notebook prop.

Nor do I think he is all that good at this; what a balatant fishing expedition. Along with self justification at the end that he is helping people.

http://www.ew.com/article/2015/11/06/hollywood-medium-trailer-premiere-date-jaime-pressly

Terri Kavanaugh – I once saw a video of a woman dispersing “chemtrails” with a spray bottle of vinegar. It made me sad and uncomfortable. Your comment makes me feel much the same way.

It wouldn’t surprise me a great deal if he is quite sincere. He’s young. The young are uniformly idiots. Except for the those who aren’t.
Take a kid who has limited experience (i.e. is young), perhaps isn’t especially sharp, add some older adults, especially those from the petty amusement trades who smell profit and will encourage the kid and stroke his ego, and you get someone like Tyler Henry. I see a Macaulay Culkin, just pointed in a different direction.

If he tells a few parents of kids who have committed suicide that they did it because the parents were horrible people who made everyone around them miserable, I’ll be even more convinced of his sincerity.

Yet another scammer, and the worst kind of scammer at that, one who preys on the families of suicides. This makes me angry enough that I’d like to smack him around.

Doug,

I can’t figure out how he can get around not knowing it is fake when someone would need to gather and then tell him the information. In the video I linked to for example, that Jamie was born in the South where there are many houses with white pillars and that there is a dry cleaner with that name in her town. Not sure how the other info was obtained but it certainly is easier to find things out about celebrities than the rest of us.

Then there was the midget psychic who escaped from jail….

Police are looking for a small medium at large.

Re.Mephistopheles O’Brien @ 32:

Yeah, those videos make me squirm too. Silly fools spraying vinegar in the air to erase chemtrails. I use Windex.

Like the commercial says, “Windex cleans up even the most stubborn chemtrails without leaving streaks or soapy film on the sky! On sale now!”

Not a Troll,

“Jamie was born in the South where there are many houses with white pillars”

He may have noticed a bit of an accent. The “white pillars” is just antebellum architecture (or faux-antebellum), a romanticized feature of the South. It probably wouldn’t matter if there were only one such building in her home town, it would fit with her mental concept of the south.

#30 Jane Ostentatious

But Jane, did your mother come back? I knew one woman from the UK who went to Hawaii and never went back. Well, she might have dropped in to visit her son when passing through Heathrow.

I went afollowin’ some links. I discovered there is an American Board for Scientific Medical Intuition.

Terri:
Someone close to me took her life too. If this dude came up to me and told me he could communicate with her, I predict he would be bent over clutching his junk about one second later.

@Gray Squirrel – I’ve seen My Big Fat Greek Wedding. You don’t have to sell me on the miracle substance that is Windex.

Gahh. Skeptics. In the spirit of the new X-files premier tomorrow, “you ought to want to believe” or totally square.

An anecdotal: After one particular individual in my life lost his best chess partner to a sort of ‘suicide by accidental death’, him and the widow, in memoriam during a home gathering after ‘visitation’ (aka pity party), struck up a game of the ol’e 8×8.

During the endgame, and with a seeming crushing defeat for the non-widow opponent, the daughter of the deceased (three years of age) reached down, grabbed the queen, and placed it on a valid square. This lead to a forced mate in three for the widow.

^^ I think that is particulary striking for a little girl that considered any move of any piece valid — including to place it across the room somewhere.

Cut the kid some slack; Perhaps he is a grifter or perhaps he really believes in his ‘ability’ and is being exploited — I’d feel bad if scorchingly bad reviews of his ‘performance’ hastened him to go and meet those of which he supposedly speaks.

That said, I do think I’d like to see him doing a ‘reading’ of Justin Beiber — Is that bad?

I predict he would be bent over clutching his junk about one second later.

You would be striking a happy medium. No court would convict you.

I can’t say I like the term ‘Grief Vampire’ either.
May I suggest ‘Grief Leech’? It’s what I usually call them.

HDB #45

He won’t be happy after that blow, however, odds are that he’ll remain gay.

“Windex cleans up even the most stubborn chemtrails without leaving streaks or soapy film on the sky! On sale now!”

If you drink enough, everything becomes invisible.

TBruce,

If you wear size 10 shoes, I can lend you my work boots for that occasion 😉

Alain

Gaahh! You’d think that the Fox sisters coming clean would have ended this crap forever, or the debunking done by Arthur Conan Doyle and Houdini working together.
(Sir Arthur was looking for an “honest” medium. Houdini broke with Doyle when he kept insisting that Houdini had “mediumistic powers” that were responsible for his abilities. It’s hard to blame Doyle. Even though he was a believer years before, the appalling loss of relatives and friends in World War 1 – his son, brother, and nephew, the brother of his brother-in-law, all five sons of his wife’s best friend, and more – pushed him irretrievably into spiritualism as a religion.)

Alain,
Thanks for the offer, but I’ve got size 9 Doc Martens. What’s good enough for Pete Townshend vs Abbie Hoffman is good enough for me.

I have schizophrenia, in particualar constant auditory hallucinations. As tempting as stuff like this is I try to stay away from it, I have to. It kind of reaffirms my notion that society is pretty schizophrenic these day. Much like my voices the internet and TV spew out all this stuff. Some is good some isn’t and the clarity of thought is needed to discern the right way through. For whatever that is worth.

This kid is full of it, he ought to get a real job somewhere, is all I have to say about him.

Another anti-psychic story – my SO received a telephone call. He was supposed to give a tour to a group of psychics at a historic site but had completely forgot. He was upset – he’d never forgotten about a tour before. He wasn’t amused by my response – I was rolling around laughing that “If they were psychics, shouldn’t they have seen that coming?”

Guess not.

She is a certified [sic] by Caroline Myss PhD,Norman Shealy MD and the American Board of Scientific Medical Intuition

…where the ABSMI is simply a company set up by Myss and Shealy to sell Grifter Certificates.

Looks legit to me

I knew jrkrideau was going to say that.

hdb,
Ah, you noticed she is certified [sic] by Caroline Myss PhD but did you see that she has studied Medical Intuition Science with Carolyn Myss Ph.D.

Norman Shealy MD

He was part of the reason why my 2015 Dead Pool portfolio tanked, as it happens.

Yoru Teruhiko

Who likes Chicago?

I like some of their early albums, and I’ve enjoyed their concerts over the years.

I just watched him on Dr. Phil. He read a girl who had lost a friend in a car accident. It was easily explained cold reading and rather upsetting to watch actually. Dr. Phil called himself a ” healthy skeptic”. Heh.

Yoru [email protected]

Who likes Chicago?

Hi JP (or Yoru Teruhiko now). I live and work here (well I live in the suburbs and work in the city). Do I like it? We have the best pizza, the best hockey team and a beautiful skyline. We also do well in the categories of potholes, corruption and murder so… I like it enough that I wouldn’t want to work in the suburbs but not living in the city is worth the commute.

I just watched the first part of this dude’s new show. He and his “Mommy” are driving to a “reading”. They both insist over and over that they have NO idea who they are going to see until that someone opens the door. BULLSHIT! This show and this guy is so fake! They’ve roped in all of these celebrities for him to do these FAKE readings with and you can tell they are faking it right along with him.

I think the long term goal here is to start doing bookings with all of the idiots at home who will watch the show. They’ll BELIEVE that if he can help a celebrity, he can surely help them! The MONEY will roll in. People are so gullible. It’s really sad….

I can’t imagine a better target clientele for a medium than celebrities, given the amount of trivial information readily available about their lives online. Even the passing of a celebrity’s pet badger in a tragic croquet accident likely made it into an interview at some point.

Maybe this kid can offer a serious challenge to John Edward’s Biggest Douche in the Universe crown.

capnkrunch, I’ve had pizza in Chicago, and the truth is that the quality of pizza is in inverse proportion to the distance of the pizzeria from Phil’s Pizza on Kings Highway in Brooklyn.
Except for all those Original Ray’s Pizza, Famous Ray’s Pizza, Original Famous, Famous Original, Those Other Guys Are Liars We’re The Real Ray’s Pizza, Aboriginal Rays’ Pizza, and all the others in Manhattan of that subset. Their pizza is just about as good as I imagine the pizza in Ulan Bataar is.

Devil’s Advocate department:

It occurs to me that many of these “successful psychics” may in fact have a higher than average degree of empathy, enabling them to pick up on others’ feelings easily.

If that’s true, then it’s possible that they could be encouraged to go the whole academic route to practice clinical psych or at least marital & family counseling. Along the way it’s more probable than not, that finding a viable channel for using their empathic abilities will get them off the “psychic” track and into a legitimate track.

By analogy, someone with a talent for picking locks can be encouraged to become a licensed locksmith rather than a burglar. Some of them might still end up as burglars, but some will switch tracks to lawful employment, and it’s worth making the effort to encourage them to do so.

Along the way it’s more probable than not, that finding a viable channel for using their empathic abilities will get them off the “psychic” track and into a legitimate track.

What, and leave show business?

i have just finished watching an episode of tyler henry’s reading. I have a very open mind about stuff like this and believe that it is true. I my self and other members of my family have had small encounters with the other side. For those that call people like him quacks or vampire or whatever for whatever reason need to think about this…just because you don’t believe in it doesn’t make it fake. just because he’s on t.v to share other peoples experiences with his readings dosen’t mean that hes some kind of shark. As with making money off of the show he has to have some kind of income to be able to make it to all of the places he goes. Gas and living is not free. It does not mean that he is taking advantage of anyone. I myself would love to meet with him and have a reading from him just to see what he can tell me. I know I have a lot of questions for him that he may or may not be able to answer. What he reads is not entirely up to him, it is how the spiritual ones convey to him and it is up to him to translate what they send him. it might not be what anyone wants to hear but it is what the spiritual ones want to say to the ones that they are reaching out to. And I believe that he may be able to do great things when helping families with loved ones that have passed away due to suicide. when people die from suicide a lot of the times the loved ones don’t know why they did it. with tyler helping families of suicide victims it just might give them closer. I my self had a best friend that committed suicide and no one knows why. her family and myself have no closure as to what led her to do it.

Rebecca, you are entitled to your own beliefs, but not to your own facts. When you come back with actual scientific fact that the young man is actually speaking to the dead and his other claims then we will be convinced.

Until then, he is taking advantage of the desperate and that is unforgivable.

@ Gray Squirrrel:

Sure. In order to scam people you need a reasonable degree of person perception, social cognition, interpersonal skills, ability to ‘read’ motivation, non-verbal communication skills- whatever you’d like to call it. Psychics aren’t the only ones in this category -btw-.

And I truly believe that at least SOME ‘psychics’ think that their ‘powers’ are real and do want to help others.

The problem is that scammers won’t spend the time – years!- and money to become a counsellor/ psychologist – they want easy money probably instantly
and the true believers have no reason to study because they believe that they have a gift and are helping people already.
They may even believe that their gift is pure and from g-d or the universe. Not from universities and books.

And I believe that he may be able to do great things when helping families with loved ones that have passed away due to suicide. when people die from suicide a lot of the times the loved ones don’t know why they did it. with tyler helping families of suicide victims it just might give them closer. I my self had a best friend that committed suicide and no one knows why. her family and myself have no closure as to what led her to do it.

If she didn’t explicitly tell anyone while she was alive, what makes you think she will now that she’s dead? Even if you could reach her, why would you? If you believe you can reach her, then don’t you think she can reach you? And if she could, and wanted to tell you, wouldn’t she?

Do you people EVER take your heads out of your own navels??

We have the best pizza…

Some would beg to differ –
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrqSizC-T-4
(May not be safe for work, but bad words are bleeped)

It occurs to me that many of these “successful psychics” may in fact have a higher than average degree of empathy, enabling them to pick up on others’ feelings easily.

If that’s true, then it’s possible that they could be encouraged to go the whole academic route to practice clinical psych or at least marital & family counseling. Along the way it’s more probable than not, that finding a viable channel for using their empathic abilities will get them off the “psychic” track and into a legitimate track.

You know The Mentalist was fiction, right?

If that’s true, then it’s possible that they could be encouraged to go the whole academic route to practice clinical psych or at least marital & family counseling.

Maybe but mental health services is not known to pay very well…unless you get a gig like Dr. Phil has.

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