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Bad science Medicine Politics Pseudoscience Science Skepticism/critical thinking Television

President Trump and “just asking questions” about disinfectants and UV light to treat COVID-19

Last night, President Trump remarked about somehow getting disinfectants or light “inside” the body could kill coronavirus. Hilarity ensued, but his inadvertent promotion of COVID-19 quackery is deadly serious.

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Autism Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Medicine Quackery Religion

Bleaching away what ails you: Miracle Mineral Solution and Jim Humble’s Genesis II Church

It’s time to get this video clip out again: Yes, just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in. But who are “they”? I’m referring to the cult that thinks that bleach enemas (and also ingested bleach) will cure children of autism. I was reminded of that cult when ABC News 20/20 […]

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Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Medicine Skepticism/critical thinking

Why a case report being circulated by advocates doesn’t show that the ketogenic diet combats cancer

it’s October, which means that it’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which means that it’s time for dubious breast cancer case reports. Here’s one about ketogenic diets that doesn’t show that such diets cure cancer.

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Medicine

The Genesis II Church holds a secret MMS quackery conference in England

Regular readers might have wondered why there was no post yesterday. The answer’s simple: A combination of work and having to fly out to Buffalo for the CFI Reason for Change conference, where I’ll be on a panel on (of course!) alternative medicine later today. That same combination means that this post will be uncharacteristically […]

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Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Medicine Skepticism/critical thinking

A bait-and-switch study of acupuncture in stable chronic angina

This week, JAMA Internal Medicine published a clinical trial purporting to find that acupuncture helps stable angina. Here’s a hint: It doesn’t. It’s a bait-and-switch study that used “electroacupuncture” instead of acupuncture with poor blinding and lack of consideration of prior plausibility.