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Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery Television

Jennifer Block and Elisa Albert in the NYT: “Misogyny and the patriarchy are why skeptics attack Goop!”

Jennifer Block and Elisa Albert defend the quackery and pseudoscience and quackery sold by Goop by accusing its critics of misogyny and engaging in whataboutism. It does not go well.

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Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking Television

the goop lab on Netflix: Selling quackery under the guise of female “empowerment”

“the goop lab” will premiere on Netflix on January 24. It’s just the latest goop vehicle to sell quackery to women under the guise of “empowerment.”

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Bad science Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Medicine Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking

Gwyneth Paltrow and Goop: Allergic to fact-checking

Earlier this week, the New York Times ran a fascinating feature about Gwyneth Paltrow and Goop. In it, we learn—surprise! surprise!—that Gwyneth Paltrow does not like fact-checking. We also learn that the criticism of Goop’s selling of pseudoscience and quackery has reached the point where Paltrow has given in and plans to hire a fact checker. Unfortunately, I strongly suspect that it will do no good and that skeptics will have as much work to do refuting Goop’s quackery after the fact-checker is hired as we do now.

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Homeopathy Medicine Naturopathy Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking

An unholy combination of methodolatry and quackery apologia—with jade eggs

Meet Dr. Jason Fung. Dr. Fung is unhappy with skeptics and thinks they’re hypocrites behaving like religious fanatics. Unfortunately for him, his arguments are a combination of the worst methodolatry of evidence-based medicine combined with rants against conventional medicine and a defense of quackery.

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Medicine Popular culture Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking

Bee venom acupuncture: Deadly quackery that can kill

Bee venom acupuncture is a form of apitherapy (treatment with bee products, such as venom, honey, or pollen) in which bee venom is injected along acupuncture points, often by actual bees. It also recently resulted in the death of a woman from anaphylactic shock. Basically, the use of bee venom acupuncture cannot be justified because it has no proven benefits and is potentially deadly.